How to Increase Conversions by Connecting with Your Audience

Perhaps the most difficult step in any business interaction with a potential client or customer is the moment where they decide to convert or not. People love to buy, but they hate to be sold to.

If you can present whatever product you’re offering in such a way that it doesn’t look like you’re trying to sell it to them then you may just get those conversions you’re after. That means building a connection, that means getting your audience to believe in your product, and that means using emotion to do those very things.

The use of emotion as a strategy starts even before you present some kind of content to your audience that will resonant with them. KISSmetrics believes that creating a connection begins with your targeting, or the kinds of people you market to. They shared research by Pringle & Field that found that “emotional campaigns outperform on almost every metric including revenue, profit, and share gain.”

But that all starts with the people you target. Some people may have a different kind of response to a particular story or emotion than others. If your audience responds well to happiness (as many do) then that should become the focus of your online content. It’s message, it’s look, and it’s very feel should breathe joy.

People tend to respond to and mimic the emotional stimuli around them, and if your content makes them happy that just might get them on your side.

If happiness doesn’t seem to suit your audience or its goals, you may choose to inspire instead. This is an incredibly powerful force, especially in the business world. Harness people’s desire to transcend their circumstances, to do and to be more. If you do, you have a good chance of engaging their heart and their mind.

This could be managed with testimonials that show how your product has had a genuine impact on someone’s life. This could be as simple as sharing the story of your business, and how you want to make your clients the heroes of that story.

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The idea of storytelling as a marketing technique is well-worn, and we’ve talked about it at length even here at 13p5, but there’s a reason for that. It works. There’s no force more powerful in the world when it comes to engaging people’s emotions than a good story.

If your goal is to build that emotional connection that can do so much for your conversions, applying storytelling to every aspect of your business is a great way to get there. This starts with your visual identity. That old axiom that a picture speaks a thousand words never stopped being true. As Kissmetrics puts it, “a good visual stimulates people’s sense. It can create fear, elicit pity, or showcase friendship.”

It’s surprisingly how powerful good images can be, and the different effects they can have. Even different types of fonts can impact how people respond to what you are putting on offer.

And then, of course, storytelling should be infused into your content itself. Share anecdotes that attest to your message. Frame your product’s development like a story, and how your customer is the hero that is going to make it all possible.

That means sharing your trials and tribulations and all it took to get to where you are now. That’s an advantage startups have that big businesses simply can’t replicate. Startups are made up of infinitely better stories that are worth telling. Don’t let that potential go to waste. Share your story.

— ZK

 

 

 

The idea of storytelling as a marketing technique is well-worn, and we’ve talked about it at length even here at 13p5, but there’s a reason for that. It works. There’s no force more powerful in the world when it comes to engaging people’s emotions than a good story.

If your goal is to build that emotional connection that can do so much for your conversions, applying storytelling to every aspect of your business is a great way to get there. This starts with your visual identity. That old axiom that a picture speaks a thousand words never stopped being true. As Kissmetrics puts it, “a good visual stimulates people’s sense. It can create fear, elicit pity, or showcase friendship.”

It’s surprisingly how powerful good images can be, and the different effects they can have. Even different types of fonts can impact how people respond to what you are putting on offer.

And then, of course, storytelling should be infused into your content itself. Share anecdotes that attest to your message. Frame your product’s development like a story, and how your customer is the hero that is going to make it all possible.

That means sharing your trials and tribulations and all it took to get to where you are now. That’s an advantage startups have that big businesses simply can’t replicate. Startups are made up of infinitely better stories that are worth telling. Don’t let that potential go to waste. Share your story.

 

 

 

 

Ed Lynes13p5Comment